Behinder and Behinder: Sun, Moon, Stars, Rain

Rather than feel ridiculous and un-horsed, I’d prefer to “feel” (in public at least) as “tested” and perhaps “tried.”  Hence the henceforth herewith. (Something like that, anyway).

I am so far behind with work, not only with blogging, as a result of the cratering of my two computers, that I’m having the off the wall fantasy that if I just sit still like a dead rock maybe it will all stop its whining – whirling. And maybe go away.

Fact is (and haha this takes guts to admit) the world will not come to an end if I don’t meet deadlines. I might but the blessed world will continue to spin.

So back to writing “deathless prose” and cut to the bone criticism and back here soon and as fast as I can  levitate.

Meantime, appropriately, consider this, as it puts it all in rather dreary, ghastly perspective (Good God, forefend! I’m not there YET, Don’t bury me next to my ain true love just yet, dammit, just keep these computers chuggin’): Anyway, were I truly tragic–and if this prelude were anything more than pure baloney–this magnificent poem will save the day–

anyone lived in a pretty how town

E. E. Cummings, 18941962
anyone lived in a pretty how town
(with up so floating many bells down)
spring summer autumn winter
he sang his didn’t he danced his did

Women and men(both little and small)
cared for anyone not at all
they sowed their isn’t they reaped their same
sun moon stars rain

children guessed(but only a few
and down they forgot as up they grew
autumn winter spring summer)
that noone loved him more by more

when by now and tree by leaf
she laughed his joy she cried his grief
bird by snow and stir by still
anyone’s any was all to her

someones married their everyones
laughed their cryings and did their dance
(sleep wake hope and then)they
said their nevers they slept their dream

stars rain sun moon
(and only the snow can begin to explain
how children are apt to forget to remember
with up so floating many bells down)

one day anyone died i guess
(and noone stooped to kiss his face)
busy folk buried them side by side
little by little and was by was

all by all and deep by deep
and more by more they dream their sleep
noone and anyone earth by april
wish by spirit and if by yes.

Women and men(both dong and ding)
summer autumn winter spring
reaped their sowing and went their came
sun moon stars rain

The Poetry Foundation on cummings:

“Among the most innovative of twentieth-century poets,” according to Jenny Penberthy in the Dictionary of Literary Biography, E. E. Cummings experimented with poetic form and language to create a distinct personal style. A Cummings poem is spare and precise, employing a few key words eccentrically placed on the page. Some of these words were invented by Cummings, often by combining two common words into a new synthesis. He also revised grammatical and linguistic rules to suit his own purposes, using such words as “if,” “am,” and “because” as nouns, for example, or assigning his own private meanings to words. Despite their nontraditional form, Cummings’ poems came to be popular with many readers.

“No one else,” Randall Jarrell claimed in his The Third Book of Criticism, “has ever made avant-garde, experimental poems so attractive to the general and the special reader.”

Read the rest here! http://www.poetryfoundation.org/bio/e-e-cummings

 

About Margaret Jean Langstaff

A lifelong critical reader with literary tastes, a novelist, short story writer, essayist, book critic, and professional book editor for many years. A consultant to publishers and authors, providing manuscript critiques and a full range of editorial services. A friend and supporter of all other readers and writers. A collector of signed modern first editions. Animal lover and tree hugger. Follow me on Twitter @LangstaffEditor
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2 Responses to Behinder and Behinder: Sun, Moon, Stars, Rain

  1. My first favorite poet, and still one of my favorites.

    Liked by 1 person

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